Frogner Park (Frognerparken) is a public park located in the borough of Frogner in Oslo, Norway. The park contains the world famous Vigeland Sculpture Park (Vigelandsanlegget) designed by Gustav Vigeland.
Photo by Tom Simonsen

Frogner Park (Frognerparken) is a public park located in the borough of Frogner in Oslo, Norway. The park contains the world famous Vigeland Sculpture Park (Vigelandsanlegget) designed by Gustav Vigeland.

Photo by Tom Simonsen

Monday Coffee
Norwegian style…

Monday Coffee

Norwegian style…

Not far from the Arctic Circle, the Norwegian island of Vega boasts one of the most scenic landscapes in the world—jagged mountains rising in the background, mossy plants and brush growing over chiseled boulders, and uninterrupted views of the Norwegian Sea. In this distinctly Nordic environment, traditional huts known as naust sit by the seaside. These windowless wooden cottages have straightforward tectonic forms and a strong material vocabulary, weathered over the years from standing in this oft harsh terrain.
(via architizer:) Not far from the Arctic Circle, the Norwegian island of Vega boasts one of the most scenic landscapes in the world—jagged mountains rising in the background, mossy plants and brush growing over chiseled boulders, and uninterrupted views of the Norwegian Sea. In this distinctly Nordic environment, traditional huts known as naust sit by the seaside. These windowless wooden cottages have straightforward tectonic forms and a strong material vocabulary, weathered over the years from standing in this oft harsh terrain.
(via architizer:)

Not far from the Arctic Circle, the Norwegian island of Vega boasts one of the most scenic landscapes in the world—jagged mountains rising in the background, mossy plants and brush growing over chiseled boulders, and uninterrupted views of the Norwegian Sea. In this distinctly Nordic environment, traditional huts known as naust sit by the seaside. These windowless wooden cottages have straightforward tectonic forms and a strong material vocabulary, weathered over the years from standing in this oft harsh terrain.

(via architizer:)

Husky! The dog taxi transfer service that collects you from the airport

A hotel in Norway has launched a “dog taxi” service, giving customers a chance to be collected from the airport in style. Read more

Photograph: Kirkenes Snow Hotel

(via guardian:)

Dreaming (by Peter Przybille)

Alaskan Husky Tex dreaming in the landscape of Northern Norway

Waiting for the ferry (by wylka)

Norway

Skogen (by Ashild Kanstad Johnsen)

"took the train from Oslo to Bergen, this is the view from window

(Source: sempius)

Cabin next to Senja Island, Norway in the Arctic Ocean

(via cabinporn:)

  1. Camera: Canon IXUS 105
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/320th
  4. Focal Length: 28mm

Henningsvaer at night (by Kristian Westgard)

"Evening in Henningsvær is beautiful - especially when the weather is calm and the sun is letting its golden rays of light shine down in low angles on the mountains.

The weather isn’t always this beautiful in Henningsvær, its location north of the polar circle and far out in the North Atlantic ocean, without shelter, makes the place exposed to harsh weather.

The place is the centre of the famous “Lofotfiske” (Lofot-fishing). It starts in march and gathers a whole lot of fishermen and their boats with only one goal: To catch as much Atlantic cod as they are alowed to. Then the harbour in the picture is filled up with boats and people.”

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 40D
  2. Aperture: f/3.5
  3. Exposure: 1/100th
  4. Focal Length: 89mm

Old Norse (by Andrew Telling)

Old Norse is a short film documenting Conor Harrington’s trip to Vardø, Norway.

Album Art

Nils Petter Molvaer with Sidsel Endresen - Only These Things Count

(via burlveneer-music:)

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The Oseberg
Using authentic techniques and tools, a team in Norway has built a seaworthy replica of the 9th century Viking ship, the Oseberg. In 1904, the well-preserved, beautifully decorated ship was found in a burial mound in the Slagen Valley outside Tønsberg, Norway, along with the remains of two women, sleds, tapestries and wagons. The replica took $2 million to build today, so to have such a magnificent funeral in such an expensive ship, the women had to be important—the elder of the two is guessed to been a queen or a seeress. Two previous attempts at building a replica have failed, but this time, the project pre-planning was meticulous, involving laser and computer scannings of the increasingly-fragile original ship, which is on display in a museum in Bygdøy. The building took place in public view in Tønsberg’s harbour. The builders were volunteers from a variety of crafts—boat builders, carpenters, smiths, and textile workers were all involved, and they all used tradictional methods and tools from archaeological reconstruction. The ship is 21.5 m long, propelled by 15 pairs of oars and a square sail of about 80 metres square, and it was launched last week—and found seaworthy.
Watch the launch on Youtube
(via sciencesoup:) The Oseberg
Using authentic techniques and tools, a team in Norway has built a seaworthy replica of the 9th century Viking ship, the Oseberg. In 1904, the well-preserved, beautifully decorated ship was found in a burial mound in the Slagen Valley outside Tønsberg, Norway, along with the remains of two women, sleds, tapestries and wagons. The replica took $2 million to build today, so to have such a magnificent funeral in such an expensive ship, the women had to be important—the elder of the two is guessed to been a queen or a seeress. Two previous attempts at building a replica have failed, but this time, the project pre-planning was meticulous, involving laser and computer scannings of the increasingly-fragile original ship, which is on display in a museum in Bygdøy. The building took place in public view in Tønsberg’s harbour. The builders were volunteers from a variety of crafts—boat builders, carpenters, smiths, and textile workers were all involved, and they all used tradictional methods and tools from archaeological reconstruction. The ship is 21.5 m long, propelled by 15 pairs of oars and a square sail of about 80 metres square, and it was launched last week—and found seaworthy.
Watch the launch on Youtube
(via sciencesoup:) The Oseberg
Using authentic techniques and tools, a team in Norway has built a seaworthy replica of the 9th century Viking ship, the Oseberg. In 1904, the well-preserved, beautifully decorated ship was found in a burial mound in the Slagen Valley outside Tønsberg, Norway, along with the remains of two women, sleds, tapestries and wagons. The replica took $2 million to build today, so to have such a magnificent funeral in such an expensive ship, the women had to be important—the elder of the two is guessed to been a queen or a seeress. Two previous attempts at building a replica have failed, but this time, the project pre-planning was meticulous, involving laser and computer scannings of the increasingly-fragile original ship, which is on display in a museum in Bygdøy. The building took place in public view in Tønsberg’s harbour. The builders were volunteers from a variety of crafts—boat builders, carpenters, smiths, and textile workers were all involved, and they all used tradictional methods and tools from archaeological reconstruction. The ship is 21.5 m long, propelled by 15 pairs of oars and a square sail of about 80 metres square, and it was launched last week—and found seaworthy.
Watch the launch on Youtube
(via sciencesoup:)

The Oseberg

Using authentic techniques and tools, a team in Norway has built a seaworthy replica of the 9th century Viking ship, the Oseberg. In 1904, the well-preserved, beautifully decorated ship was found in a burial mound in the Slagen Valley outside Tønsberg, Norway, along with the remains of two women, sleds, tapestries and wagons. The replica took $2 million to build today, so to have such a magnificent funeral in such an expensive ship, the women had to be important—the elder of the two is guessed to been a queen or a seeress. Two previous attempts at building a replica have failed, but this time, the project pre-planning was meticulous, involving laser and computer scannings of the increasingly-fragile original ship, which is on display in a museum in Bygdøy. The building took place in public view in Tønsberg’s harbour. The builders were volunteers from a variety of crafts—boat builders, carpenters, smiths, and textile workers were all involved, and they all used tradictional methods and tools from archaeological reconstruction. The ship is 21.5 m long, propelled by 15 pairs of oars and a square sail of about 80 metres square, and it was launched last week—and found seaworthy.

Watch the launch on Youtube

(via sciencesoup:)