The human heart is like a night bird. Silently waiting for something, and when the time comes, it flies straight toward it.

Haruki Murakami, from Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage (Knopf, 2014)

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Ten simple tricks for figuring out whether or not you are trapped inside of a Haruki Murakami novel.

7. You are incredibly good at describing any room you are currently in. Every detail is outlined, with strict attention paid to the seemingly non-essential items that fill in the gaps of a careful description. To hear you describe a room is to be able to imagine every single object with perfect clarity, down to how smoothly the paint lies on the walls. You do not know how to describe emotions.

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All the music collected from Haruki Murakami’s books

Check out this detailed catalog of the music in the work of Haruki Murakami by book: http://haruki-music.com/

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“People sometimes sneer at those who run every day, claiming they’ll go to any length to live longer. But don’t think that’s the reason most people run. Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you’re going to while away the years, it’s far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive than in a fog, and I believe running helps you to do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that’s the essence of running, and a metaphor for life — and for me, for writing as whole. I believe many runners would agree” 
 ― Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running
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“People sometimes sneer at those who run every day, claiming they’ll go to any length to live longer. But don’t think that’s the reason most people run. Most runners run not because they want to live longer, but because they want to live life to the fullest. If you’re going to while away the years, it’s far better to live them with clear goals and fully alive than in a fog, and I believe running helps you to do that. Exerting yourself to the fullest within your individual limits: that’s the essence of running, and a metaphor for life — and for me, for writing as whole. I believe many runners would agree” 

― Haruki Murakami, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

(via vintageanchorbooks:)

“No one seemed to know the club’s address—not Murakami’s translator, Jay Rubin, nor the fan who runs Haruki Murakami Stuff. After comparing Google’s map of central Tokyo with a satellite shot from a Japanese website, I switched to street view and scanned block by block, searching for the corner building depicted in a photo I’d seen on the blog A Geek in Japan and checking off intersections on a hand-drawn map as I went. Finally, there it was: a drab three-story cement building. Outside, a first-floor, a restaurant had set up a sampuru display of plastic foods. Above it, an orange banner advertised dining cafe.”

In Harper’s, Aaron Gilbreath on Haruki Murakami’s jazz club

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Norwegian Wood, from Japanese film magazine Kinema Junpo
(submitted by Michael W.)
(via murakamistuff:) Norwegian Wood, from Japanese film magazine Kinema Junpo
(submitted by Michael W.)
(via murakamistuff:)

Norwegian Wood, from Japanese film magazine Kinema Junpo

(submitted by Michael W.)

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"When there’s nothing to do, you do nothing slowly and intently."

Haruki Murakami - Dance Dance Dance

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"We’re both looking at the same moon, in the same world. We’re connected to reality by the same line. All I have to do is quietly draw it towards me."

Haruki Murakami - Sputnik Sweetheart

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"I don’t know, there’s something about you. Say there’s an hourglass: the sand’s about to run out. Someone like you can always be counted on to turn the thing over."

Haruki Murakami - A Wild Sheep Chase

(via diveinme)

VINTAGE MURAKAMI

Murakami’s new backlist design uses the circle as a central motif and the palette is limited to red, black and off-white. This creates a strong and consistent identity for the set. 

Murakami’s work has a sense that something has been lost or hidden, what is real and what is not. To match this playfulness for the covers, we commissioned Noma Bar, a talented Israeli-born and London-based illustrator. His powerful graphic illustrations cleverly utilise negative space concealing secondary images and illusions. Noma’s illustrations were screenprinted by hand to give them a personal and softer edge.

Noma Bar is represented by Dutch Uncle and can be found here.

Covers Illustrated by Noma Bar (except Birthday Stories and Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman).

(via vintagebooksdesign:)

"Beyond the window, some kind of small, black thing shot across the sky. A bird, possibly. Or it might have been someone’s soul being blown to the far side of the world."
— Haruki Murakami (1Q84)

(Source: adieufranz)

Time weighs down on you like an old, ambiguous dream. You keep on moving, trying to sleep through it. But even if you go to the ends of the earth, you won’t be able to escape it. Still, you have to go there - to the edge of the world. There’s something you can’t do unless you get there.

— Haruki Murakami

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(Source: middays)

Contemporary Authors as Adjectives

Haruki Murakami - Murakamiesque: Marked by dream-like surreality and communal alienation. Also, containing many cats.

(viamurakamistuff:)