Osechi (New Year’s Food) (by aloalo*)

Osechi (by bananagranola)

"These boxes for new year table were delivered to our home from the restaurant in Kyoto.
36 kinds of beautiful traditional cuisine in the two boxes were very delicious.”

Happy new year!

Japanesque lunch course (by Teruhide Tomori)

Kyoto, Japan

Maki Sushi (by ric_w)
There are two main types of sushi, nigiri-zushi, which is vinegared rice hand-formed into oval shapes and topped with various raw and cooked seafood, and maki-zushi which is vinegared rice combined with seafood and vegetables then wrapped in an edible seaweed called nori and sliced into rounds. Nigiri-zushi is quite finicky to make at home and we tend to eat this type of sushi at Japanese restaurants and sushi bars. Maki-zushi, on the other hand, is far easier to prepare in your own kitchen and the taste of these delightful morsels has left many (including us) with an addiction for life! This sushi recipe requires a sushi mat for rolling.
2½ cups Japanese short-grain rice (like Koshihikari rice)2½ cups cold water4 tablespoons rice vinegar3 tablespoons superfine (caster) sugar2 teaspoons saltYour choice of fillings (see Sushi roll variations below)6 sheets noriJapanese soy saucePickled ginger (gari)Wasabi paste
PLACE the rice in a colander and rinse thoroughly under the tap until the water runs clear, then drain well. PLACE the rice and the cold water in a medium saucepan and bring to the boil. COVER the saucepan, turn the heat down to very low, and cook for 15 minutes without lifting the lid. TURN off the heat and allow to stand 10 minutes more, still covered, then spoon the rice into a large bowl. MIX together the vinegar, sugar and salt in a small bowl until the sugar dissolves, then drizzle over the rice. MIX together gently to coat the rice with the sushi vinegar, then set aside to cool to room temperature. TOAST each nori sheet very lightly by passing back and forth quickly over a stove-top hot plate (don’t place it too close to the heat or else the delicate nori will burn). FOR instructions on how to fill, roll and eat sushi rolls click here.
Rolling the sushi step-by-step.

Maki Sushi (by ric_w)

There are two main types of sushi, nigiri-zushi, which is vinegared rice hand-formed into oval shapes and topped with various raw and cooked seafood, and maki-zushi which is vinegared rice combined with seafood and vegetables then wrapped in an edible seaweed called nori and sliced into rounds. Nigiri-zushi is quite finicky to make at home and we tend to eat this type of sushi at Japanese restaurants and sushi bars. Maki-zushi, on the other hand, is far easier to prepare in your own kitchen and the taste of these delightful morsels has left many (including us) with an addiction for life! This sushi recipe requires a sushi mat for rolling.

2½ cups Japanese short-grain rice (like Koshihikari rice)2½ cups cold water4 tablespoons rice vinegar3 tablespoons superfine (caster) sugar2 teaspoons saltYour choice of fillings (see Sushi roll variations below)6 sheets noriJapanese soy saucePickled ginger (gari)Wasabi paste



PLACE the rice in a colander and rinse thoroughly under the tap until the water runs clear, then drain well. PLACE the rice and the cold water in a medium saucepan and bring to the boil. COVER the saucepan, turn the heat down to very low, and cook for 15 minutes without lifting the lid. TURN off the heat and allow to stand 10 minutes more, still covered, then spoon the rice into a large bowl. MIX together the vinegar, sugar and salt in a small bowl until the sugar dissolves, then drizzle over the rice. MIX together gently to coat the rice with the sushi vinegar, then set aside to cool to room temperature. TOAST each nori sheet very lightly by passing back and forth quickly over a stove-top hot plate (don’t place it too close to the heat or else the delicate nori will burn). FOR instructions on how to fill, roll and eat sushi rolls click here.

Rolling the sushi step-by-step.

Sushirolls (by aloalo*)

Ingredients: cooked shrimp, sashimi salmon and avocado, sesame leaves and sesame

Autumn Sweets (by aloalo*)

Japanese wagashi made from chestnuts

Dragon Soup (by Today’s Nest)

Before you start:

I am making a plea to you again to try making your own stock. Check out our basic chicken stock recipe.

The ingredients:

  • 2 cups chicken stock (homemade or store bought)
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 dried Japanese red peppers
  • 1 inch of ginger root
  • 1 cup shredded cooked chicken breast
  • 2/3 cup carrot, julienned
  • 2/3 cup celery, julienned
  • 1/4 cup scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup dried Chinese noodles
  • salt 
  • pepper

The method:

  1. Heat stock, water, ginger, and peppers in a saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Add carrots, celery, salt and pepper.  Heat until vegetables are just a bit soft.
  3. Place noodles in cold water for 3 minutes.  Remove from cold water and transfer to soup mix about 5 minutes before serving.
  4. Add shredded chicken.
  5. Add scallions, salt, and pepper. Stir briefly before serving. 

Back to Basic (by bananagranola)

rice + miso soup + umeboshi

Kuri Gohan (Chestnut Rice) (by bananagranola)

chestnuts, rice, glutinous rice, sake, salt, konbu, goma-shio

Strawberry Daifuku (by Wagashi Pix)

"Ichigo (strawberry) daifuku is a new variation of daifuku, containing strawberry and sweet filling, most commonly anko, inside a small round rice cake. It is often eaten during winter or spring season.

Daifuku is well-known traditional Japanese sweet, but strawberry daifuku is kind of like a newcomer which was just invented in the 1980s. Although few people tend to take it as ‘improper’ wagashi, but it has already come to be very popular sweet for most of Japanese people.

Many patisseries claim to have invented the confection, so its exact origin is vague.”

Tartes Aux Raisins (by Sinemage)

Preparing dark chocolate tartlet shells (by stephsus)

for apricot, pistachio, and dark chocolate mousse tartlets. Full recipe on the blog

Autumn Brunch (by hanabi.)

Borsch (by Cintamani ;-))