Female Torso (Tara)

Eastern India / Pala period, 11th century

Black chlorite

clevelandart.org

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"This is an important point about symbols: they do not refer to historical events; they refer through historical events to spiritual or psychological principles and powers that are of yesterday, today, and tomorrow, and that are everywhere."
Joseph Campbell, Goddesses: Mysteries of the Feminine Divine

SHALABHANJIKA - TREE GODDESS

MEDIEVAL INDIA 

X/XI Th cent. AD

Magnificent goddess in pink sandstone

from the area of Madhya Pradesh

galeriegolconda.com

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Diana by Edward McCartan. American. 1879-1947. bronze

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  1. Camera: SONY
  2. Aperture: f/74099370.666667
  3. Exposure: 74099370.666667"
  4. Focal Length: 74099370mm

Buffalo-Slayer Goddess, made in Iran in the 7th-8th century  (source)

(via myimaginarybrooklyn: / aleyma:)

"Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virile. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched."

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth

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(Source: ynannarising)

Neolithic Goddess

Figurines appear in the archaeological record throughout Europe, mainly in the South-east, South-west Asia, and the Mediterranean area from the Cyclades, Majorca, and Malta. Female figurines from the Neolithic and Copper Age Cyclades were first described as a group in the 1880s but there was no attempt to link them to the goddess. From Central Europe to the  Near East during the Neolithic period archaeology has previously revealed thousands of anthropomorphic terracotta figurines, nearly all less than six inches high. 

Balkan figurines, and Greek, were kept inside habitations and hosed in special wall niches (Malone, 1993). In the Karanovo Culture many figurines are forms of the Bird Goddess, others a pregnant goddess, as well as zoomorphic and stiff nude figures. In the Starcevo Culture there also occur ornithomorphic vases dating from circa 5900-5800 BC.  The Cucuteni-Trypillian Culture flourished in the region of modern-day Romania, Moldova, and south west Ukraine from 500 to 2750 BC. This culture left behind numerous clay figures some of which represent the Mother Goddess.

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"

"This… moon principle is that of life engaged in the field of time and space, in the field of phenomenal apparitions and dis-apparitions of forms. The sun, on the other hand, is never shadowed except in eclipse, and so does not carry its death within it; thus is represents consciousness disengaged from the field of time and space.

"…The great mystic realization is that these two aspects of consciousness are in fact one consciousness, so that your consciousness here in the field of life is at the same time disengaged from this field. The paradox of relating oneself to these two aspects of one’s own true being and entity is the great mystical balancing act. It is a dangerous path - the sharp edge of the razor - the path between the knowledge of yourself as consciousness in the field and knowledge of yourself as consciousness in disengagement from the field. You can tip either way— and then there comes an inappropriate attitude, inflation or deflation of one kind or another.

"The goal of all meditation and mystery journeys is to go between the pair of opposites."

"
Joseph Campbell, Goddesses: Mysteries of the Feminine Divine

THE MOTHER GODDESS SARDA

prenuragic Ozieri culture (3500-2700 BC), Sardinia

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"Now, the energies of nature are present in the outer world, but also inside ourselves, because we are particles of nature. So when you are meditating on a deity, you are meditating on powers of your own spirit and psyche, and on powers that are also out there. One finds in practically all the religious traditions of the world (with a few exceptions) that the aim is for the individual to put himself into accord with nature, with his nature, and that’s both physical and psychological health. These are what in our traditions are called the nature religions, and the deities are not final terms; they are references to spiritual energies. So when mythology is properly understood, the object that is revered and venerated is not a final term; the object venerated is a personification of an energy that dwells within the individual, and the reference of mythology has two modes—that of consciousness and that of the spiritual potentials within the individual."
Joseph Campbell, Goddesses: Mysteries of the Sacred Feminine
Electrum plaque of bee goddess
Goddess maybe a representation of the goddess Artemis, greek goddess of nature. It is 3.2cm high en 2cm wide (1 ¼ x 13/16 inch).
Greek, East Greek, 640 – 630 BC.
Made in Kameiros, Rhodes, Greece.
Source: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  
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Electrum plaque of bee goddess

Goddess maybe a representation of the goddess Artemis, greek goddess of nature. It is 3.2cm high en 2cm wide (1 ¼ x 13/16 inch).

Greek, East Greek, 640 – 630 BC.

Made in Kameiros, Rhodes, Greece.

Source: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  

(via ancientpeoples:)

“This statue carries within herself a history of the worship of the feminine principle that echoed up through time. Even today our most basic, universal human experience is that of our mother’s body. It is our very first sensation.”

This week on Getty Voices, educator and religion buff Erin Branham talks about the ancient sacred and the differences between religion in ancient times and today.

Fertility Goddess, made on Cyprus, 3000–2500 B.C. The J. Paul Getty Museum

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Ishtar 
Parthian reclining figure of a woman, alabaster, 2nd-1st c. bce
Setareh, Esther, Aphrodite, Venus = both the morning and evening star, the dual goddess of love and war ..
(via badesaba:) Ishtar 
Parthian reclining figure of a woman, alabaster, 2nd-1st c. bce
Setareh, Esther, Aphrodite, Venus = both the morning and evening star, the dual goddess of love and war ..
(via badesaba:) Ishtar 
Parthian reclining figure of a woman, alabaster, 2nd-1st c. bce
Setareh, Esther, Aphrodite, Venus = both the morning and evening star, the dual goddess of love and war ..
(via badesaba:)

Ishtar 

Parthian reclining figure of a woman, alabaster, 2nd-1st c. bce

Setareh, Esther, Aphrodite, Venus = both the morning and evening star, the dual goddess of love and war ..

(via badesaba:)

Goddess Bast

Ancient Egyptian Cat Goddess. Patron Goddess of pleasure and music, She also was protectress against contagious diseases and evil spirits. Mother of all cats, Egypt’s most sacred animal. Bubastis, Her Holy city was home to the land’s greatest temple. Cats were taken to the Holy city upon their deaths, where they were embalmed in Sacred Temples and buried. Originally in the Nile delta, Lion Goddess of Sunset, symbolizing the fertilizing force of the Sun’s rays. She ruled pleasure and dancing, music and joy. Bestower of mental and physical health. Hundreds of thousands of Her worshipers gathered in Her holy city Bubastis where they were greeted by flutes. It was a great celebration - worship service and vast trade fair.

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