The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:) The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:) The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:) The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:)

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 

(via worclip:)

Ascer Ceramic House by Héctor Ruiz-Velázquez

Hans J. Wegner the Sawbench Chair, 1951, made by Carl Hansen, Denmark.

Photograph by Pedro Martinez

(via scandinaviancollectors:)

Pearls - Jewels of the Sea

an exhibition by the V&A and the Qatar Museums Authority exploring the history of pearls from the early Roman Empire through to present day

1960s German poster for JOUR DE FÊTE (Jacques Tati, France, 1949)

Designer: Dorothea Fischer-Nosbisch (b. 1927) [see also]

Poster source: MoviePosterDB

(via movieposteroftheday:)

Russian Matchbox Label

Russian Matchbox Label

Italian Paper Artist Andrea Russo

Finn Jull - Chieftain Chair

(via be-programmed:)

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 450D
  2. Aperture: f/11
  3. Exposure: 1/3th
  4. Focal Length: 37mm

Bound Earth Necklace by Andrea Williams

(via artpropelled:)

Stig Lindberg, TV Set Lumavision, 1959. For Luxor. Sweden.
(via design-is-fine:)

Stig Lindberg, TV Set Lumavision, 1959. For Luxor. Sweden.

(via design-is-fine:)

Williams Maxwell Kimono Tea Cup & Saucer