Settembre (by antonio•merini)

On The Road (by philippe conquet)

Sensibility (by one eyed fish)

Poetry (by 美撒郭)

Frangipani (by goldenlo02)

Frangipani (by goldenlo02)

Thinking is Seeing (by Sophie Shapiro)

Every human science is based on deduction, which is a slow process of seeing by which we work from the effect to the cause. In a wider sense, all poetry like every work of art proceeds from a swift vision of things.

Honoré De Balzac

Transparent (by oldmirror)

For a Lover (by Kalie Garrett)

Marlene Dietrich photographed in 1952 by Eve Arnold

Pink Poppy (by Alicia Bock)
photo location: Iceland

Pink Poppy (by Alicia Bock)

photo location: Iceland

Capucine, 1957 by Slim Aarons

Capucine, 1957 by Slim Aarons

Sensibility (by one eyed fish)

John Vachon, Times Square, 1943

John Vachon, Times Square, 1943

(Source: the-night-picture-collector)

Piazza di Spagna, Rome (by gnuckx)

In the Piazza at the base is the Early Baroque fountain called Fontana della Barcaccia (“Fountain of the Old Boat”), built in 1627-29 and often credited to Pietro Bernini, father of a more famous son, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who is recently said to have collaborated on the decoration. The elder Bernini had been the pope’s architect for the Acqua Vergine, since 1623. According to an unlikely legend, Pope Urban VIII had the fountain installed after he had been impressed by a boat brought here by a flood of the Tiber river.

In the piazza, at the corner on the right as one begins to climb the steps, is the house where English poet John Keats lived and died in 1821; it is now a museum dedicated to his memory, full of memorabilia of the English Romantic generation. On the same right side stands the 15th century former cardinal Lorenzo Cybo de Mari’s palace, now Ferrari di Valbona, a building altered in 1936 to designs by Marcello Piacentini, the main city planner during Fascism, with modern terraces perfectly in harmony with the surrounding baroque context.

At the top the Viale ramps up the Pincio which is the Pincian Hill, omitted, like the Janiculum, from the classic Seven hills of Rome. From the top of the steps the Villa Medici can be reached.