Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:) Mariko Mori 
Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.
PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future. 
I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …
Wikipedia:
Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.
The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.
Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here
(via prostheticknowledge:)

Mariko Mori 

Japanese artist whose work combines technology, mythology, and culture.

PK NOTE: I don’t know why, but my mind wondered back to an exhibition of the artist I saw at the Serpentine Gallery in 1998. It was the first time i saw big reproductions of images created with (I imagine) Photoshop, wearing specific glasses to watch a short film in 3D (similar to what we now experience in cinemas today) - probably my first experience of the digital arts, and certainly a taste of the future.

I haven’t been following the artist since then (oddly) so this is a re-acquaintence for me, and hopefully, will capture the interests of some of you too …

Wikipedia:

Mariko Mori (森 万里子, Mori Mariko, born 1967 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese video and photographicartist. While studying at Bunka Fashion College, she worked as a fashion model in the late 1980s. This strongly influenced her early works, such as Play with Me, in which she takes control of her role in the image, becoming an exotic, alien creature in everyday scenes. In 1989, she moved to London to study at the Chelsea College of Art and Design.

The juxtaposition of Eastern mythology with Western culture is a common theme in Mori’s works, often through layering photography and digital imaging, such as in her 1995 installation Birth of a Star. Later works, such as Nirvana show her as a goddess, transcending her early roles via technology and image, and abandoning realistic urban scenes for more alien landscapes.

Last Departure

The artist moved from images and visuals to more sculptural, physical works, mainly natural and minimalistic, yet featuring colourful glows. Here is an interview with the artist about a piece for her latest work, Primal Rhythm:

You can find out more examples of the artist’s work the at the Gallerie Perrotin website here

(via prostheticknowledge:)