Alvar Aalto

Early cantilevered armchair with stepped base, model no. 31.

(via redhousecanada:)

(Source: scandinaviancollectors)

Tropical Pouch (linen) by Amelie Mancini

Pomegranate Vase by NewMoonStudio

Motion Silhouette

Japanese childrens’ book that features pop-up shapes to cast shadows for the reader to bring motion to its story - video embedded below:

(Google Translation:)

This book is his second picture book that changes its shape depending on the environment.

I will begin to talk about the story and illustrations shadow falls on top of the page overlap. In this work, you can enjoy the animation of shadow phantasmagoric by you move the light. Trees and become bigger and bigger, which aims to train a distant star. Story that changes depending on the page falling shadows, shadows move around the top of the page.

Please enjoy the silhouette meaning and shape change in various ways.

You can find out more at the motion-silhouette Tumblr page here

(via prostheticknowledge: / @prostheticknowl)

beautiful & brilliant!

Isamu Noguchi, Chess Table, 1948-49, ebonised plywood, cast aluminium, plastic insets

Photograph by John R. Glembin

Responding to a critical mass of chess- obsessed avant-garde artists in New York in the early 1940s, the gallerist Julien Levy invited a number of them to create chess sets for The Imagery of Chess exhibition at his gallery in 1944. Having already produced a handful of mass-manufactured items for Knoll and Herman Miller, Noguchi’s table combined function alongside aesthetic considerations, with a swiveling top concealing a hollow tray for storing the accompanying chess pieces. Herman Miller manufactured the table in 1947-48 but discontinued the IN-61 model due to low demand.

(via thenoguchimuseum:)

Knoll Ad 1957 (via sandiv999)

By Herbert Matter, from L’Œil Magazine, March 1957

(via preciousandfregilethings: / larameeee:)

Furniture Design by Nicola Conti

Italian product and interior designer Nicola Conti has created a beautiful and unique furniture series.

(via weandthecolor:)

Visions of Places

Beautiful computer animation short by CATK uses minimal design to convey a non-verbal narrative - video embedded below:

Visions Of Places was sparked by the question of how much information is needed to evoke the imagination of a story. When visiting new places there are always potential stories that happened there or will be happening in the future. It even suggests that almost nothing triggers richer imagination.

More Here

(via prostheticknowledge:)

Insekt Desk by Kelly Smits
Beautiful and functional desk
There is lots of space to store papers, drawings etc. In the desk top is a groove for little trash and pens and a opening for computer and lightning cables to disappear.
(via nothingtochance:) Insekt Desk by Kelly Smits
Beautiful and functional desk
There is lots of space to store papers, drawings etc. In the desk top is a groove for little trash and pens and a opening for computer and lightning cables to disappear.
(via nothingtochance:) Insekt Desk by Kelly Smits
Beautiful and functional desk
There is lots of space to store papers, drawings etc. In the desk top is a groove for little trash and pens and a opening for computer and lightning cables to disappear.
(via nothingtochance:)

Insekt Desk by Kelly Smits

Beautiful and functional desk

There is lots of space to store papers, drawings etc. In the desk top is a groove for little trash and pens and a opening for computer and lightning cables to disappear.

(via nothingtochance:)

(Source: nothingtochance)

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:) The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:) The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:) The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell
The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 
(via worclip:)

The Floyd Leg by Kyle Hoff and Alex O’Dell

The Floyd Leg is a tool that gives you the framework to take ownership of your furniture.  It rethinks the table leg by combining an age old device—the clamp—with a clean, minimal design allowing you to take any flat surface and create a table.
The Legs emerged from a personal need and curiosity of mine three years ago. I was living a rather nomadic lifestyle with work and school taking me to different cities. In each new place, I found myself buying (and ultimately) discarding furniture.  I was looking for a work desk that was easy to pack up and move around with. In addition, I wanted something that was beautiful (don’t we all?).
It occurred to me that if I built a set of legs with a minimal and functional design, any surface material could be changed out; simply pack up the legs and then find a flat work surface in the next city. It wouldn’t require any building knowledge and only a few minutes to set up. Searching out material palettes would be an interesting and low-cost endeavor. It was sustainable because no alterations to the surfaces were being made. Thus, the legs were born. 

(via worclip:)