Tibetan Nomad (by falsalama)

"We are homesick most for the places we have never known."
Album Art

Steely Dan Aja - Aja

Album: Aja

(via barrywone:)

Played 649 times.

Black Tea Cake with Honey Buttercream

Yields 9-inch cake (2 5-inch cakes or 18 cupcakes)

Black Tea Cake 
1 cup (235 ml) milk 
3 tablespoons black tea (or the contents of 3 tea bags) 
1/4 cup (55 grams) butter, room temperature 
1 cup (225 grams) granulated sugar 
2 large eggs 
1/4 cup vegetable oil 
1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
1 3/4 cups (175 grams) cake flour 
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 
1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
1/2 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C). Grease a 9-inch round cake pan.

Warm the milk until near boiling on the stove or in the microwave. Cut open the tea bags and add the tea directly into the milk. Allow to cool.

In a large mixing bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in the vegetable oil and vanilla extract. Gradually add in the cake flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir in the tea brewed milk, mixing until batter is uniform and smooth.

Transfer batter to prepared pan and bake for 30-40 minutes (18-22 minutes for cupcakes), or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Remove from the oven and allow to cool before frosting or serving.

Honey Buttercream 
1/2 cup (110 grams) butter, room temperature 
3 tablespoons honey 
2 cups (250 grams) powdered sugar 
Pinch of salt

In a large mixing bowl, beat the butter and honey until smooth. Add the powdered sugar and salt and continue mixing until the frosting comes together. If the frosting is too runny, add more powdered sugar until it reaches the right consistency. Likewise, if the frosting is too stiff, add more honey (or a splash of milk) to thin it out. If the frosting is too sweet, add a pinch more salt until the desired sweetness is achieved.

Spread or pipe the honey buttercream onto the cooled cake and serve.

"And this is good for us."

I want to write something

so simply

about love

or about pain

that even

as you are reading

you feel it

and as you read

you keep feeling it

and though it be my story

it will be common,

though it be singular

it will be known to you

so that by the end

you will think—

no, you will realize—

that it was all the while

yourself arranging the words,

that it was all the time

words that you yourself,

out of your own heart

had been saying.

—Mary Oliver, “I Want to Write Something So Simply” in Evidence: Poems

(via awritersruminations:)

Photography by Sureeyapon Sri-ampai (Menoevil) | on Facebook
Click on each image to see the title
(via arpeggia:) Photography by Sureeyapon Sri-ampai (Menoevil) | on Facebook
Click on each image to see the title
(via arpeggia:) Photography by Sureeyapon Sri-ampai (Menoevil) | on Facebook
Click on each image to see the title
(via arpeggia:) Photography by Sureeyapon Sri-ampai (Menoevil) | on Facebook
Click on each image to see the title
(via arpeggia:)

Photography by Sureeyapon Sri-ampai (Menoevil) | on Facebook

Click on each image to see the title

(via arpeggia:)

"What if the poetic has left the poem in the same way that Elvis has left the building? Long after the limo pulled away, the audience was still in the arena screaming for more, but poetry escaped out the backdoor and onto the Internet, where it is taking on new forms that look nothing like poetry."

Kenneth Goldsmith writes about how the Internet has altered poetry: http://nyr.kr/17fE236

(via newyorker)

Tokyo Nights (by falsalama)

Album Art

Tricky - If Only I Knew

from: False Idols

(Source: exoskull)

Played 2303 times.
On Design - FIKA house, Tokyo, Japan
photos: Koichi Torimura
(via subtilitas:) On Design - FIKA house, Tokyo, Japan
photos: Koichi Torimura
(via subtilitas:) On Design - FIKA house, Tokyo, Japan
photos: Koichi Torimura
(via subtilitas:)

On Design - FIKA house, Tokyo, Japan

photos: Koichi Torimura

(via subtilitas:)

"Reading is the work of the alert mind, is demanding, and under ideal conditions produces finally a sort of ecstasy. As in the sexual experience, there are never more than two persons present in the act of reading — the writer, who is the impregnator, and the reader, who is the respondent. This gives the experience of reading a sublimity and power unequalled by any other form of communication."

E. B. White on the future of reading – timeless wisdom from 1951

(via explore-blog)

"When Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from troubled dreams, he found himself changed into a monstrous cockroach in his bed."

"He woke to discover that he had undergone a metamorphosis and become Gregor Samsa."

In its various English incarnations (this one comes from Michael Hoffman), we all know the first line. But the second, a reverse of sorts, comes from Haruki Murakami’s new story, Samsa in Love

This comes atop Sarah Lyall’s NYT article on resurrecting long-gone literary characters. It’s a trend that results in the occasional disaster or sparkling success (Grendel, Wide Sargasso Sea, The Hours, etc.), but most often it’s just a lot of fun and a good way to keep the classics in our contemporary imagination.

(via classicpenguin:)

Wan Chai marmelade melody (by paolobarzman)

Hong Kong