"Reading rebels against the managed world of information & the chaotic world of data. Reading is meaning."

Jeanette Winterson

(via withoutpillow)

Puerh energy (by Matthew Wild)

Album Art

Cesaria Evora - Flor di Nha Esperanca

Album: Cafe Atlantico

(via tessarlo: )

Played 3631 times.

The unbeckoned (by brendan ó)

"The problem with gender, is that it prescribes how we should be, rather than recognising how we are. Now imagine how happier we would be, how much freer - to be our true individual selves, if we
didn’t have the weight of gender expectations."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

[x]

(via elaimee)

(Source: tangerinezzz)

Sakura by Sibylle Schwarz

Sakura by Sibylle Schwarz

Cauto - Ona

(via sputnika:)

Audrey Tautou

Audrey Tautou

(Source: in-the-strawberry-swing)

"A thoroughly good relationship with ourselves results in being still, which doesn’t mean we don’t run and jump and dance about. It means there’s no compulsiveness. We don’t overwork, overeat, oversmoke, overseduce. In short, we begin to stop causing harm."

Pema Chödrön

(via samsaranmusing)

it was a green dream (by serap günay)

"To begin a new novel, I look for the biggest problem in my life that I can’t solve or tolerate. Something that drives me nuts, but I can’t fix. Then I find a metaphor that allows me to explore the problem, exaggerating and expanding it beyond reason. I build it up to the worst scenario possible and then find a way to solve it. By the time the book is done, I’ve exhausted all of my emotions around the original problem. Whatever it was, it no longer bothers me. And typically, during the time of writing, the problem has resolved itself. It’s like magic. Try it. It will keep you alive in this world of bullshit."

Chuck Palahniuk

(via wordpainting)

はじち「Hajichi」
Any avid Japan fan knows that tattoos are more or less taboo.
However, before the turn of the 19th century, an ancient tradition by the name of Hajichi existed, unique to Okinawa. Women in Okinawa would ritually receive these tattoos as a coming of age symbol. When they get engaged to be married, Okinawan women were tattooed using bamboo sticks; the process was done by a ‘hajicha’.
The tattoos represent a symbol of strength and wealth in society. Most common symbols are the arrow-head on the fingertips, meaning not to come back [upon marriage to another family] and circles being wound-up thread. Today, however, the number of woman remaining with ‘Hajichi’ are dwindling because of the views of and Meiji-era ban of tattoos in modern Japan.
(via fuckyeahnativejapanese:)

はじち「Hajichi」

Any avid Japan fan knows that tattoos are more or less taboo.

However, before the turn of the 19th century, an ancient tradition by the name of Hajichi existed, unique to Okinawa. Women in Okinawa would ritually receive these tattoos as a coming of age symbol. When they get engaged to be married, Okinawan women were tattooed using bamboo sticks; the process was done by a ‘hajicha’.

The tattoos represent a symbol of strength and wealth in society. Most common symbols are the arrow-head on the fingertips, meaning not to come back [upon marriage to another family] and circles being wound-up thread.
Today, however, the number of woman remaining with ‘Hajichi’ are dwindling because of the views of and Meiji-era ban of tattoos in modern Japan.

(via fuckyeahnativejapanese:)

"Goodbye Tsugumi" by Banana Yoshimoto.  Goodbye Tsugumi is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Maria is the only daughter of an unmarried woman. She has grown up at the seaside alongside her cousin Tsugumi, a lifelong invalid, charismatic, spoiled, and occasionally cruel. Now Maria’s father is finally able to bring Maria and her mother to Tokyo, ushering Maria into a world of university, impending adulthood, and a “normal” family. When Tsugumi invites Maria to spend a last summer by the sea, a restful idyll becomes a time of dramatic growth as Tsugumi finds love and Maria learns the true meaning of home and family. She also has to confront both Tsugumi’s inner strength and the real possibility of losing her. 
(via bookmania:)

"Goodbye Tsugumi" by Banana Yoshimoto.  Goodbye Tsugumi is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Maria is the only daughter of an unmarried woman. She has grown up at the seaside alongside her cousin Tsugumi, a lifelong invalid, charismatic, spoiled, and occasionally cruel. Now Maria’s father is finally able to bring Maria and her mother to Tokyo, ushering Maria into a world of university, impending adulthood, and a “normal” family. When Tsugumi invites Maria to spend a last summer by the sea, a restful idyll becomes a time of dramatic growth as Tsugumi finds love and Maria learns the true meaning of home and family. She also has to confront both Tsugumi’s inner strength and the real possibility of losing her. 

(via bookmania:)

That Time, From So Long Ago (by Jon Siegel)