Tissue Animals (by OjiNepia)

Created by Yuki Ariga for Japanese paper manufacturer Nepia this lovely animated short features a cavalcade of delicately folded tissue paper animals. If you’re interested, here’s the making of video.

Album Art

Johann Sebastian Bach - Double Violin Concerto in D minor, BWV 1043 (1. Vivace) 

Performed by Trio Con Brio

(via catherinewillisa4rizmBachjustdeduceit:)

Played 339 times.

Portrait (by massimo sbreni)

"Nature is a haunted house—but Art—is a house that tries to be haunted."

Emily Dickinson, The Letters of Emily Dickinson, Volume 1

(via liquidnight)

The difference between the narrator in Swann’s Way going to bed and finding an entire world of memory and experience dislodged by a madeleine dipped in tea, and us as readers, is not to do with his richness of feeling and perception and our poverty of it. He is not cleverer or more brilliant or more sensitive than we are. It is to do with what happens next, and what Proust as a writer gives us: language coming to grips with variations of thought and feeling, remembering and misremembering, fullness and emptiness of emotion, that we all have but which we cannot find a language for.
- Patrick McGuiness’s lovely Guardian piece, "Who’s Afraid of Marcel Proust" 
(via classicpenguin:)

The difference between the narrator in Swann’s Way going to bed and finding an entire world of memory and experience dislodged by a madeleine dipped in tea, and us as readers, is not to do with his richness of feeling and perception and our poverty of it. He is not cleverer or more brilliant or more sensitive than we are. It is to do with what happens next, and what Proust as a writer gives us: language coming to grips with variations of thought and feeling, remembering and misremembering, fullness and emptiness of emotion, that we all have but which we cannot find a language for.

- Patrick McGuiness’s lovely Guardian piece, "Who’s Afraid of Marcel Proust" 

(via classicpenguin:)

de dessinent puis disparaissent

se dispersent dans les airs 

Listen/purchase: L’Astronome by Françoiz Breut

(via vitalsings:)

Nikdo se nebude smát
Hynek Bocan 1966
(via blejz: / peggymoffitt:)

Nikdo se nebude smát

Hynek Bocan 1966

(via blejz: / peggymoffitt:)

Literary Birthday: André Gide, born 22 November 1869, died 19 February 1951

10 Quotes

  1. The artist who is after success lets himself be influenced by the public. Generally such an artist contributes nothing new, for the public acclaims only what it already knows, what it recognizes.
  2. The most beautiful things are those that madness prompts and reason writes.
  3. The colour of truth is grey.
  4. To know how to free oneself is nothing; the arduous thing is to know what to do with one’s freedom.
  5. Believe those who are seeking the truth; doubt those who find it.
  6. Everything’s already been said, but since nobody was listening, we have to start again.
  7. Know thyself. A maxim as pernicious as it is ugly. Whoever studies himself arrests his own development. A caterpillar who seeks to know himself would never become a butterfly.
  8. It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.
  9. Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.
  10. Fish die belly upward, and rise to the surface. It’s their way of falling.

Gide was a French author and winner of the 1947 Nobel Prize in literature.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

(via amandaonwriting:)

Tokyo Cafe (by alzenar)

Album Art

Olivieri - There’s No Other Girl

(via fuckyeaholdies:)

Played 453 times.
Karenina by Slava Fokk
oil on canvas40x50cm2013

Karenina by Slava Fokk

oil on canvas
40x50cm
2013

"Mathematical knowledge is unlike any other knowledge. While our perception of the physical world can always be distorted, our perception of mathematical truths can’t be. They are objective, persistent , necessary truths. A mathematical formula or theorem means the same thing to anyone anywhere — no matter what gender, religion, or skin color; it will mean the same thing to anyone a thousand years from now. And what’s also amazing is that we own all of them. No one can patent a mathematical formula, it’s ours to share. There is nothing in this world that is so deep and exquisite and yet so readily available to all. That such a reservoir of knowledge really exists is nearly unbelievable. It’s too precious to be given away to the “initiated few.” It belongs to all of us."

Love and Math – a beautiful read on the whimsy of math and how it serves as an equalizer for humanity

(via explore-blog)

Tête de Bouddha

École française d’Extrême-Orient 1931
style du Bayon (fin 12e-début 13e siècle)
grès, sculpture
Angkor Thom (terrasse bouddhique n°1) (origine), Cambodge

(C) RMN-Grand Palais (musée Guimet, Paris) / Thierry Ollivier

Section Cambodge du musée Guimet

(via museeguimet:)

Of portals & parallel worlds (by yigit uygur)