it was a green dream (by serap günay)

"To begin a new novel, I look for the biggest problem in my life that I can’t solve or tolerate. Something that drives me nuts, but I can’t fix. Then I find a metaphor that allows me to explore the problem, exaggerating and expanding it beyond reason. I build it up to the worst scenario possible and then find a way to solve it. By the time the book is done, I’ve exhausted all of my emotions around the original problem. Whatever it was, it no longer bothers me. And typically, during the time of writing, the problem has resolved itself. It’s like magic. Try it. It will keep you alive in this world of bullshit."

Chuck Palahniuk

(via wordpainting)

はじち「Hajichi」
Any avid Japan fan knows that tattoos are more or less taboo.
However, before the turn of the 19th century, an ancient tradition by the name of Hajichi existed, unique to Okinawa. Women in Okinawa would ritually receive these tattoos as a coming of age symbol. When they get engaged to be married, Okinawan women were tattooed using bamboo sticks; the process was done by a ‘hajicha’.
The tattoos represent a symbol of strength and wealth in society. Most common symbols are the arrow-head on the fingertips, meaning not to come back [upon marriage to another family] and circles being wound-up thread. Today, however, the number of woman remaining with ‘Hajichi’ are dwindling because of the views of and Meiji-era ban of tattoos in modern Japan.
(via fuckyeahnativejapanese:)

はじち「Hajichi」

Any avid Japan fan knows that tattoos are more or less taboo.

However, before the turn of the 19th century, an ancient tradition by the name of Hajichi existed, unique to Okinawa. Women in Okinawa would ritually receive these tattoos as a coming of age symbol. When they get engaged to be married, Okinawan women were tattooed using bamboo sticks; the process was done by a ‘hajicha’.

The tattoos represent a symbol of strength and wealth in society. Most common symbols are the arrow-head on the fingertips, meaning not to come back [upon marriage to another family] and circles being wound-up thread.
Today, however, the number of woman remaining with ‘Hajichi’ are dwindling because of the views of and Meiji-era ban of tattoos in modern Japan.

(via fuckyeahnativejapanese:)

"Goodbye Tsugumi" by Banana Yoshimoto.  Goodbye Tsugumi is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Maria is the only daughter of an unmarried woman. She has grown up at the seaside alongside her cousin Tsugumi, a lifelong invalid, charismatic, spoiled, and occasionally cruel. Now Maria’s father is finally able to bring Maria and her mother to Tokyo, ushering Maria into a world of university, impending adulthood, and a “normal” family. When Tsugumi invites Maria to spend a last summer by the sea, a restful idyll becomes a time of dramatic growth as Tsugumi finds love and Maria learns the true meaning of home and family. She also has to confront both Tsugumi’s inner strength and the real possibility of losing her. 
(via bookmania:)

"Goodbye Tsugumi" by Banana Yoshimoto.  Goodbye Tsugumi is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Maria is the only daughter of an unmarried woman. She has grown up at the seaside alongside her cousin Tsugumi, a lifelong invalid, charismatic, spoiled, and occasionally cruel. Now Maria’s father is finally able to bring Maria and her mother to Tokyo, ushering Maria into a world of university, impending adulthood, and a “normal” family. When Tsugumi invites Maria to spend a last summer by the sea, a restful idyll becomes a time of dramatic growth as Tsugumi finds love and Maria learns the true meaning of home and family. She also has to confront both Tsugumi’s inner strength and the real possibility of losing her. 

(via bookmania:)

That Time, From So Long Ago (by Jon Siegel)

"I encourage you to ride this strange wind that is blowing through you; to ride it to wherever it will carry you."

Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume

(via alteringminds)

(Source: secretlypartmermaid)

BuddhaChieff - Morning In Tokyo

(via silkyblackgold:)

SUNSET (by cento lodigiani)

"I had a feeling that Pandora’s box contained the mysteries of woman’s sensuality, so different from man’s and for which man’s language was inadequate."

Anaïs Nin, Diaries, February 1941

(via secretivedreams)

from the end of the earth
to the farthest sea
i search and search for my heart’s companion
[x]

Lust Caution

(Source: hs-gifs)

The misguidance of love is that it’s all about feeling good. But pride is what makes something worthwhile. Pride is what makes you care about the quality and impact of your work.

Loving what you do is not enough. The love we talk about when it comes to our work is fleeting. You can fall out of love through boredom or distraction, but pride runs much deeper. Pride doesn’t come and go with how fun things are. Pride is what gets you through the tough times when you just want to quit. Pride is the understanding that what you do and how you do it is a reflection of your character.

Francisco Dao on why, in the quest to find fulfilling work that doesn’t feel like workloving what you do is not enough.

And yet, it’s crucial not to confuse pride with prestige, the ultimate warper of purpose

(via explore-blog:)

Album Art

Four Tet - Unicorn

Album: Beautiful Rewind

With almost no fanfare, Keiran Hebden gently dropped Beautiful Rewind on us this past Thursday. Released on his own Text label. Its a really beautiful record. The influence of his recent collab with Syrian singer Omar Souleyman is quite apparent in much of the album. Every track is amazing. Unicorn is a sparkling piece of music, very reminiscent of his most uplifting classic material. 

(via undone-music:)

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