"You think because you understand ‘one’ you must also understand ‘two’, because one and one make two. But you must also understand ‘and’."

Rumi

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Downtown Dallas Hotel View

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Album Art

Kenmochi Hidefumi - Murugi

Album: Shakespeare

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Played 169 times.

“Many myths, sacred stories, and rituals are attempts to recreate a sense of stillness. This is their essence. Indeed, without some awareness of stillness, ritual takes on only its external approximation, becoming heavy and solemn. On the other hand, ritual that arises out of the experience of stillness is a light and joyful thing.

This is not inertia, but the dynamic stillness of the Self, which Abhinavagupta, the thirteenth-century master of the Kashmir Shaivite tradition of India, described as pure consciousness. It is from here that our notion of “I” as an individual self coalesces and reveals the multiplicity of the universe. Stillness is not the same thing as silence, nor is it like quieting the mind. It does not operate on a simply personal level. The stillness we are interested in knowing is always within us, even as we are within it, and we find freedom through our contact with it. As we become established in our contact with its power, we recognize that all our desires, wants, needs, insecurities, and tensions are nothing. Underlying every pursuit, and even our quest for meaning as a whole, is the longing for contact with stillness. When we have this, what more is needed?”

–Swami Chetanananda, “Stillness,” in PARABOLA, Volume XVII,  No. 3, Fall 1992: “The Oral Tradition.”

Photography Credit:  pescator on Flickr

(via parabola-magazine: / parkstepp:)

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5700 S700
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 18mm
From the series The Silk Road by Per-Anders Pettersson
The Silk Road got its name only in the 1870s by a German scholar but the trade-route, probably the greatest ever East-west trade route, was first traveled by ambassador Zhang Qian in the second century BC while on a mission from Emperor Wudi of the Han dynasty. 
 The early trade in Silk was done by great caravans of merchants and animals, traveling on some of the most inhospitable land on earth, including waterless deserts and mountain passes with snow. 
 Silk composed a small portion of the trade along the Silk Road: eastbound caravans brought gold, precious metals, stones, ivory, textiles etc, and westbound caravans transported ceramics, bronze weapons, furs, cinnamon barks and rhubarb.
 Very few caravans completed the entire route and the towns along the way became important stops on the way to take on fresh merchants, animals and goods.   These oasis towns prospered considerably because of the trading caravans.
 Perhaps the most challenging part of the trip was crossing the Liu sha, or “moving sands”, known as the Taklamakan Desert. Fierce wind and sandstorms made the crossing a challenge. Taklamakan means, “go in and you will not come out” in Turki, and has been feared by travelers for more than 2,000 years. 
A new highway was recently completed from Aksu to Hotian, the new Taklamakan desert highway that considerably cuts the traveling time through the desert.
(via findout:) From the series The Silk Road by Per-Anders Pettersson
The Silk Road got its name only in the 1870s by a German scholar but the trade-route, probably the greatest ever East-west trade route, was first traveled by ambassador Zhang Qian in the second century BC while on a mission from Emperor Wudi of the Han dynasty. 
 The early trade in Silk was done by great caravans of merchants and animals, traveling on some of the most inhospitable land on earth, including waterless deserts and mountain passes with snow. 
 Silk composed a small portion of the trade along the Silk Road: eastbound caravans brought gold, precious metals, stones, ivory, textiles etc, and westbound caravans transported ceramics, bronze weapons, furs, cinnamon barks and rhubarb.
 Very few caravans completed the entire route and the towns along the way became important stops on the way to take on fresh merchants, animals and goods.   These oasis towns prospered considerably because of the trading caravans.
 Perhaps the most challenging part of the trip was crossing the Liu sha, or “moving sands”, known as the Taklamakan Desert. Fierce wind and sandstorms made the crossing a challenge. Taklamakan means, “go in and you will not come out” in Turki, and has been feared by travelers for more than 2,000 years. 
A new highway was recently completed from Aksu to Hotian, the new Taklamakan desert highway that considerably cuts the traveling time through the desert.
(via findout:) From the series The Silk Road by Per-Anders Pettersson
The Silk Road got its name only in the 1870s by a German scholar but the trade-route, probably the greatest ever East-west trade route, was first traveled by ambassador Zhang Qian in the second century BC while on a mission from Emperor Wudi of the Han dynasty. 
 The early trade in Silk was done by great caravans of merchants and animals, traveling on some of the most inhospitable land on earth, including waterless deserts and mountain passes with snow. 
 Silk composed a small portion of the trade along the Silk Road: eastbound caravans brought gold, precious metals, stones, ivory, textiles etc, and westbound caravans transported ceramics, bronze weapons, furs, cinnamon barks and rhubarb.
 Very few caravans completed the entire route and the towns along the way became important stops on the way to take on fresh merchants, animals and goods.   These oasis towns prospered considerably because of the trading caravans.
 Perhaps the most challenging part of the trip was crossing the Liu sha, or “moving sands”, known as the Taklamakan Desert. Fierce wind and sandstorms made the crossing a challenge. Taklamakan means, “go in and you will not come out” in Turki, and has been feared by travelers for more than 2,000 years. 
A new highway was recently completed from Aksu to Hotian, the new Taklamakan desert highway that considerably cuts the traveling time through the desert.
(via findout:)

From the series The Silk Road by Per-Anders Pettersson

The Silk Road got its name only in the 1870s by a German scholar but the trade-route, probably the greatest ever East-west trade route, was first traveled by ambassador Zhang Qian in the second century BC while on a mission from Emperor Wudi of the Han dynasty.

 The early trade in Silk was done by great caravans of merchants and animals, traveling on some of the most inhospitable land on earth, including waterless deserts and mountain passes with snow. 

 Silk composed a small portion of the trade along the Silk Road: eastbound caravans brought gold, precious metals, stones, ivory, textiles etc, and westbound caravans transported ceramics, bronze weapons, furs, cinnamon barks and rhubarb.

 Very few caravans completed the entire route and the towns along the way became important stops on the way to take on fresh merchants, animals and goods.   These oasis towns prospered considerably because of the trading caravans.

 Perhaps the most challenging part of the trip was crossing the Liu sha, or “moving sands”, known as the Taklamakan Desert. Fierce wind and sandstorms made the crossing a challenge. Taklamakan means, “go in and you will not come out” in Turki, and has been feared by travelers for more than 2,000 years. 

A new highway was recently completed from Aksu to Hotian, the new Taklamakan desert highway that considerably cuts the traveling time through the desert.

(via findout:)

“The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every ‘superstar,’ every ‘supreme leader,’ every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there — on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam. …
Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity — in all this vastness — there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.”
Carl Sagan
(via kateoplis:)

“The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every ‘superstar,’ every ‘supreme leader,’ every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there — on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam. …

Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity — in all this vastness — there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.”

Carl Sagan

(via kateoplis:)

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Roxy Music - Pyjamarama

Album: The Thrill Of It All

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(Source: littlehorrorshop)

Played 1385 times.
"What we know of other people is only our memory of the moments during which we knew them."

T.S. Eliot, "The Cocktail Party"

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(Source: weepling)

the days go by (by serap günay)

Album Art

Confident lofi hip hop from the rapper Young Braised. From the Japanese Tendencies EP, out today on the already amazing 1080p label. Mastered in Vancouver’s Mood Hut, this release is a very important one for the city. The album is entirely produced by Terio outta Japan.

Check out the whole release here.

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Played 385 times.