A Coffee Moment

A Coffee Moment

"I’m going to make everything around me beautiful - that will be my life."

Elsie de Wolfe

(via abundanceofcalm)

(Source: creatingaquietmind)

Delphi, Greece Delphi, Greece Delphi, Greece Delphi, Greece Delphi, Greece Delphi, Greece
Delphi, Greece

(Source: book-of-flights)

Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.
Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].From this follows(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².
You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point.  (1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn. (3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).
Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).
More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.
Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).
Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.
Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.
See more on Wikipedia:  Spiral,  Archimedean spiral,  Cornu spiral,  Fermat’s spiral,  Hyperbolic spiral,  Lituus, Logarithmic spiral,  Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral,  Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal. 
Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.
(via blazinuzumaki: / mathhombre: / spring-of-mathematics:) Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.
Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].From this follows(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².
You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point.  (1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn. (3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).
Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).
More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.
Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).
Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.
Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.
See more on Wikipedia:  Spiral,  Archimedean spiral,  Cornu spiral,  Fermat’s spiral,  Hyperbolic spiral,  Lituus, Logarithmic spiral,  Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral,  Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal. 
Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.
(via blazinuzumaki: / mathhombre: / spring-of-mathematics:) Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.
Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].From this follows(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².
You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point.  (1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn. (3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).
Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).
More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.
Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).
Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.
Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.
See more on Wikipedia:  Spiral,  Archimedean spiral,  Cornu spiral,  Fermat’s spiral,  Hyperbolic spiral,  Lituus, Logarithmic spiral,  Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral,  Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal. 
Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.
(via blazinuzumaki: / mathhombre: / spring-of-mathematics:) Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.
Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].From this follows(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².
You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point.  (1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn. (3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).
Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).
More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.
Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).
Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.
Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.
See more on Wikipedia:  Spiral,  Archimedean spiral,  Cornu spiral,  Fermat’s spiral,  Hyperbolic spiral,  Lituus, Logarithmic spiral,  Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral,  Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal. 
Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.
(via blazinuzumaki: / mathhombre: / spring-of-mathematics:) Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.
Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].From this follows(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².
You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point.  (1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn. (3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).
Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).
More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.
Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).
Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.
Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.
See more on Wikipedia:  Spiral,  Archimedean spiral,  Cornu spiral,  Fermat’s spiral,  Hyperbolic spiral,  Lituus, Logarithmic spiral,  Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral,  Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal. 
Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.
(via blazinuzumaki: / mathhombre: / spring-of-mathematics:)

Type of Spirals: A spiral is a curve in the plane or in the space, which runs around a centre in a special way.

Different spirals follow. Most of them are produced by formulas:The radius r(t) and the angle t are proportional for the simplest spiral, the spiral of Archimedes. Therefore the equation is:
(3) Polar equation: r(t) = at [a is constant].
From this follows
(2) Parameter form:  x(t) = at cos(t), y(t) = at sin(t),
(1) Central equation:  x²+y² = a²[arc tan (y/x)]².

You can make a  spiral by two motions of a point: There is a uniform motion in a fixed direction and a motion in a circle with constant speed. Both motions start at the same point. 
(1) The uniform motion on the left moves a point to the right. - There are nine snapshots.
(2) The motion with a constant angular velocity moves the point on a spiral at the same time. - There is a point every 8th turn.
(3) A spiral as a curve comes, if you draw the point at every turn(Image).

Figure 1: (1) Archimedean spiral - (2) Equiangular Spiral (Logarithmic Spiral, Bernoulli’s Spiral).
Figure 2 : (1) Clothoide (Cornu Spiral) - (2) Golden spiral (Fibonacci number).

More Spirals: If you replace the term r(t)=at of the Archimedean spiral by other terms, you get a number of new spirals. There are six spirals, which you can describe with the functions f(x)=x^a [a=2,1/2,-1/2,-1] and  f(x)=exp(x), f(x)=ln(x). You distinguish two groups depending on how the parameter t grows from 0.

Figure 4:  If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is increasing, the spirals run from inside to outside and go above all limits. The spiral 1 is called parabolic spiral or Fermat’s spiral.
Figure 5: If the absolute modulus of a function r(t) is decreasing, the spirals run from outside to inside. They generally run to the centre, but they don’t reach it. There is a pole.  Spiral 2 is called the Lituus (crooked staff).

Figure 7: Spirals Made of Line Segments.

Source:  Spirals by Jürgen Köller.

See more on Wikipedia:  SpiralArchimedean spiralCornu spiralFermat’s spiralHyperbolic spiralLituus, Logarithmic spiral
Fibonacci spiral, Golden spiral, Rhumb line, Ulam spiral
Hermann Heights Monument, Hermannsdenkmal.

Image: I shared at Spirals by Jürgen Köller - Ferns by Margaret Oomen & Ferns by Rocky.

(via blazinuzumaki: / mathhombre: / spring-of-mathematics:)

Album Art

Raul Ramirez - Amsterdam

album: Ecomusica Vol. 2

Played 123 times.

The official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup is beautiful

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Fresh Clam Chowder

serves 6

4 pounds small, raw Manila clams in the shell
1 pound red potatoes (about 3 medium), chopped into 1/2-inch bite-size cubes
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 sprigs fresh thyme
1/2 pound pancetta, cubed or bacon, sliced
1 large red onion, thinly sliced
1 stalk celery, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 large carrots, peeled and thinly sliced into rounds
1 to 3 tablespoons chili paste, to taste
1 1/2 cups whole milk
1 cups heavy cream
Freshly ground black pepper
Italian flat leaf parsley, for garnish

Place the clams in a colander and rinse thoroughly under cold running water. Discard any clams with broken or open shells. Allow the clams to drain in the sink while you prepare your stock base.

In a large stock pot, bring about 5 cups of water to a boil and cook the potatoes until al dente, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove the potatoes with a slotted spoon, but do not drain off the water.

While the potatoes are boiling, in a second large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat the oil and thyme over low heat. Add the pancetta to the oil and thyme and cook, stirring often, about 5 minutes, making sure not to burn the bacon. Add the red onion, celery and garlic, and cook, stirring often, until the vegetables are translucent, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the carrots and chilli paste, and cook until the carrots soften slightly, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the potatoes and 3 cups of potato water and stir to combine.

Keep this chowder base warm over low heat, or refrigerate for up to 1 day. When ready to finish the soup, warm the chowder base over low heat. 

When ready to serve, cook the clams. Working in batches, place enough clams to fill but not crowd the bottom of a heavy-bottomed sauté pan over medium heat. Ladle 1 cup of the chowder base on top and cover the pan. Simmer for about 4 minutes, or until the majority of clams open. Pick out any clams that have not opened. Transfer cooked clams to the pot with the chowder base, and continue cooking in batches until clams are all cooked. 

Add the milk and cream to the pot and bring the chowder to a simmer. Ladle individual servings into large soup bowls.

Serve with cracked black pepper and chopped parsley. 

"It would not be too much to say that myth is the secret opening through which the inexhaustible energies of the cosmos pour into human cultural manifestation. Religion, philosophies, arts, the social forms of primitive and historic man, prime discoveries in science and technology, the very dreams that blister sleep, boil up from the basic, magic ring of myth."
— Joseph Campbell, The Hero With A Thousand Faces

Alone (by Marser)

Housen-in Temple, Kyoto, Japan

Album Art

Isaac Hayes - Never Can Say Goodbye

album: Black Moses

(via the-theme-is:)

Played 301 times.

Swing Jazz

Participation in Swink project - Poster Exhibition. Inspired by Django Reinhardt.

Illustration by Nearchos Ntaskas 

(via polkadot-design:)

You fall in love with people’s minds.

— Anaïs Nin, Henry & June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anais Nin. Harcourt, 1986

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Coffee Time

Coffee Time

"The people dreamed and fought and slept as much as ever. And by habit they shortened their thoughts so that they would not wander out into the darkness beyond tomorrow."
— Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter