Espresso in a storm (by EspressoTime)

"The roots of all living things are tied together. Deep in the ground of being, they tangle and embrace. If we look deeply, we find that we do not have a separate self-identity, a self that does not include sun and wind, earth and water, creatures and plants, and one another."

Joan Halifax  

(via shaktilover)

(Source: sun-hawk)

llustrations by Edmund Dulac for the book ” Dreamer of Dreams” by Queen Marie of Romania
‘The dreamer of dreams’ by the Queen of Rumania; illustrated by Edmund Dulac.Published 1900 by Hodder & Stoughton, London.

See the complete book here
(via fuckyeahvintageillustration: / fleurdulys:) llustrations by Edmund Dulac for the book ” Dreamer of Dreams” by Queen Marie of Romania
‘The dreamer of dreams’ by the Queen of Rumania; illustrated by Edmund Dulac.Published 1900 by Hodder & Stoughton, London.

See the complete book here
(via fuckyeahvintageillustration: / fleurdulys:) llustrations by Edmund Dulac for the book ” Dreamer of Dreams” by Queen Marie of Romania
‘The dreamer of dreams’ by the Queen of Rumania; illustrated by Edmund Dulac.Published 1900 by Hodder & Stoughton, London.

See the complete book here
(via fuckyeahvintageillustration: / fleurdulys:) llustrations by Edmund Dulac for the book ” Dreamer of Dreams” by Queen Marie of Romania
‘The dreamer of dreams’ by the Queen of Rumania; illustrated by Edmund Dulac.Published 1900 by Hodder & Stoughton, London.

See the complete book here
(via fuckyeahvintageillustration: / fleurdulys:)

llustrations by Edmund Dulac for the book ” Dreamer of Dreams” by Queen Marie of Romania

‘The dreamer of dreams’ by the Queen of Rumania; illustrated by Edmund Dulac.Published 1900 by Hodder & Stoughton, London.

See the complete book here

(via fuckyeahvintageillustration: / fleurdulys:)

The Only Known Photograph of Einstein Deriving his Famous E=mc2 Equation
At a public lecture in Pittsburgh in 1934, four hundred lucky students were privy to a lecture by Albert Einstein, in which the great man mathematically derived his famous mass-energy equivalence equation: E=mc2. What you see above is a photo from that lecture, and what is thought to be the only surviving photo that shows Einstein working on that derivation.

The photo was pulled from a halftone newspaper clipping by David Topper and Dwight Vincent of the University of Winnipeg, who discovered it in 2007. Sadly, everything is a bit fuzzy so you can’t really make out the famed equation itself. And even though the original article had a crisp picture of Einstein posing next to one of his blackboards, he’s next to the wrong one.
Here’s a closer look at the man and the math. If you look closely, you’ll see the mass-energy equivalence in the lower left hand corner of the blackboard on the right:
Fortunately, Topper and Vincent managed to take the blurry photo and reproduce both blackboards in their original paper. Here’s the math behind the magic, the derivation of mass-energy equivalence as presented by Albert Einstein.
In case you’re wondering why the famous equation says Δ
via bobbycaputo: proofmathisbeautiful: sagansense:) The Only Known Photograph of Einstein Deriving his Famous E=mc2 Equation
At a public lecture in Pittsburgh in 1934, four hundred lucky students were privy to a lecture by Albert Einstein, in which the great man mathematically derived his famous mass-energy equivalence equation: E=mc2. What you see above is a photo from that lecture, and what is thought to be the only surviving photo that shows Einstein working on that derivation.

The photo was pulled from a halftone newspaper clipping by David Topper and Dwight Vincent of the University of Winnipeg, who discovered it in 2007. Sadly, everything is a bit fuzzy so you can’t really make out the famed equation itself. And even though the original article had a crisp picture of Einstein posing next to one of his blackboards, he’s next to the wrong one.
Here’s a closer look at the man and the math. If you look closely, you’ll see the mass-energy equivalence in the lower left hand corner of the blackboard on the right:
Fortunately, Topper and Vincent managed to take the blurry photo and reproduce both blackboards in their original paper. Here’s the math behind the magic, the derivation of mass-energy equivalence as presented by Albert Einstein.
In case you’re wondering why the famous equation says Δ
via bobbycaputo: proofmathisbeautiful: sagansense:) The Only Known Photograph of Einstein Deriving his Famous E=mc2 Equation
At a public lecture in Pittsburgh in 1934, four hundred lucky students were privy to a lecture by Albert Einstein, in which the great man mathematically derived his famous mass-energy equivalence equation: E=mc2. What you see above is a photo from that lecture, and what is thought to be the only surviving photo that shows Einstein working on that derivation.

The photo was pulled from a halftone newspaper clipping by David Topper and Dwight Vincent of the University of Winnipeg, who discovered it in 2007. Sadly, everything is a bit fuzzy so you can’t really make out the famed equation itself. And even though the original article had a crisp picture of Einstein posing next to one of his blackboards, he’s next to the wrong one.
Here’s a closer look at the man and the math. If you look closely, you’ll see the mass-energy equivalence in the lower left hand corner of the blackboard on the right:
Fortunately, Topper and Vincent managed to take the blurry photo and reproduce both blackboards in their original paper. Here’s the math behind the magic, the derivation of mass-energy equivalence as presented by Albert Einstein.
In case you’re wondering why the famous equation says Δ
via bobbycaputo: proofmathisbeautiful: sagansense:) The Only Known Photograph of Einstein Deriving his Famous E=mc2 Equation
At a public lecture in Pittsburgh in 1934, four hundred lucky students were privy to a lecture by Albert Einstein, in which the great man mathematically derived his famous mass-energy equivalence equation: E=mc2. What you see above is a photo from that lecture, and what is thought to be the only surviving photo that shows Einstein working on that derivation.

The photo was pulled from a halftone newspaper clipping by David Topper and Dwight Vincent of the University of Winnipeg, who discovered it in 2007. Sadly, everything is a bit fuzzy so you can’t really make out the famed equation itself. And even though the original article had a crisp picture of Einstein posing next to one of his blackboards, he’s next to the wrong one.
Here’s a closer look at the man and the math. If you look closely, you’ll see the mass-energy equivalence in the lower left hand corner of the blackboard on the right:
Fortunately, Topper and Vincent managed to take the blurry photo and reproduce both blackboards in their original paper. Here’s the math behind the magic, the derivation of mass-energy equivalence as presented by Albert Einstein.
In case you’re wondering why the famous equation says Δ
via bobbycaputo: proofmathisbeautiful: sagansense:)

The Only Known Photograph of Einstein Deriving his Famous E=mc2 Equation

At a public lecture in Pittsburgh in 1934, four hundred lucky students were privy to a lecture by Albert Einstein, in which the great man mathematically derived his famous mass-energy equivalence equation: E=mc2. What you see above is a photo from that lecture, and what is thought to be the only surviving photo that shows Einstein working on that derivation.

The photo was pulled from a halftone newspaper clipping by David Topper and Dwight Vincent of the University of Winnipeg, who discovered it in 2007. Sadly, everything is a bit fuzzy so you can’t really make out the famed equation itself. And even though the original article had a crisp picture of Einstein posing next to one of his blackboards, he’s next to the wrong one.

Here’s a closer look at the man and the math. If you look closely, you’ll see the mass-energy equivalence in the lower left hand corner of the blackboard on the right:

Fortunately, Topper and Vincent managed to take the blurry photo and reproduce both blackboards in their original paper. Here’s the math behind the magic, the derivation of mass-energy equivalence as presented by Albert Einstein.

In case you’re wondering why the famous equation says Δ

via bobbycaputoproofmathisbeautifulsagansense:)

"I had wished not to move the memories and I had preferred that they sleep, but they had dreamt."

"Yo he deseado no mover los recuerdos y he preferido que ellos durmieran, pero ellos han soñado."

Felisberto Hernández

(via findout:)

“Carson liked sherry with her tea, brandy with her coffee and her purse with a large flask of whiskey. Between books, when she was neither famous nor monied, she claimed she existed almost exclusively on gin, cigarettes, and desperation for weeks at a time. During her most productive years she employed a round-the-clock drinking system: she’d start the day at her typewriter with a ritual glass a beer, a way of saying it was time to work, then steadily sip sherry as she typed. If it was cold and there was no wood for the stove, she’d turn up the heat with double shots of whiskey. She concluded her workday before dinner, which she primed with a martini. Then it was off to the parties, which meant more martinis, cognac, and, oftentimes, corn whiskey. Finally, she ended the day as it began, with a bedtime beer.

“Her recuperative abilities are the stuff of legend—she would rise the following morning, shake off her hangover like so much dust, down her morning beer, and get back to work.”

The Carson McCullers Diet

(via theparisreview:)

"From the villainous Shere Khan in Kipling’s Jungle Book to the protective “guardian of the west” of Korean mythology, tigers play a more vivid role in the human psyche than perhaps any other animal. Latterly they have become a symbol for conservation, and their survival on the planet has come to represent the human struggle to balance our conflicting needs and desires."

Today is International Tiger Day: an opportunity to celebrate, and reflect upon the fate of, one of nature’s most magnificant animals.

(via The tiger: a sad tale of declining numbers | OUPblog archive)

Full moon over Luxor, Egypt

Full moon over Luxor, Egypt

Album Art

Nick Drake - Been Smoking Too Long

Album: Time Of No Reply

(Source: feelingsforsomethinglost)

Played 3821 times.
"No man knows till he has suffered from the night how sweet and dear to his heart and eye the morning can be."
Roman Sustov(Роман Сустов Belarusian, b.1977)
Men and the Moon     2002
Eclipse    2002
Letter    2002
Etchings
(via iamjapanese:) Roman Sustov(Роман Сустов Belarusian, b.1977)
Men and the Moon     2002
Eclipse    2002
Letter    2002
Etchings
(via iamjapanese:) Roman Sustov(Роман Сустов Belarusian, b.1977)
Men and the Moon     2002
Eclipse    2002
Letter    2002
Etchings
(via iamjapanese:)

Roman Sustov(Роман Сустов Belarusian, b.1977)

Men and the Moon     2002

Eclipse    2002

Letter    2002

Etchings

(via iamjapanese:)

Album Art

Jay Lawrence Trio - Almost Summer

Album: Thermal Strut

(via syng:)

(Source: jujusjazz)

Played 701 times.

Photo by Darius Jurevicius

(via howlowcananyonego:)

(Source: languageolderthanwords)

"May my mind come alive today
To the invisible geography
That invites me to new frontiers,
To break the dead shell of yesterdays,
To risk being disturbed and changed."

John O’Donohue, from “A Morning Offering”

(via litverve)