The Antidote

Sep 19

[video]

Cranberry Apple Cider Cocktail
serves 1
Ingredients:
2 ounces cranberry juice
1 ounce fresh squeezed orange juice, strained
1 ounce vodka
1 bottle hard cider, chilled (e.g. Angry Orchard Apple Ginger)
apple slice for garnish


Directions:

Fill glass and cocktail shaker with ice. Add cranberry juice, orange juice and vodka to the cocktail shaker and shake until chilled. Strain into ice filled glass. Top off the glass with the hard cider and garnish with apple slice. Sip and enjoy!

Cranberry Apple Cider Cocktail

serves 1

Ingredients:

2 ounces cranberry juice
1 ounce fresh squeezed orange juice, strained
1 ounce vodka
1 bottle hard cider, chilled (e.g. Angry Orchard Apple Ginger)
apple slice for garnish
Directions:
Fill glass and cocktail shaker with ice. Add cranberry juice, orange juice and vodka to the cocktail shaker and shake until chilled. Strain into ice filled glass. Top off the glass with the hard cider and garnish with apple slice. Sip and enjoy!

The love we need to hunt is inside ourselves, but that love is difficult prey.

Don Miguel Ruiz

” — (via primordialsoundmeditation)

(via parkstepp)

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
illustrations by Adolf Born

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

illustrations by Adolf Born

3 Leg chair in English Elm, oil finished
made by Jack Draper designer/craftsman

3 Leg chair in English Elm, oil finished

made by Jack Draper designer/craftsman

[video]

Espresso Time

Espresso Time

fernweh [feyrn-vey]” —

(noun) This wonderful, untranslatable German word describes the feeling of homesickness for a far away land, a place you have never visited. Do not confuse this with the english word, wanderlust; Fernweh is much more profound, it is the feeling of an unsatisfied urge to escape and discover new places, almost a sort of sadness. You miss a place you have never experienced, as opposed to lusting over it or desiring it like wanderlust. You are seeking freedom and self-discovery, but not a particular home. 

(via petrichour)

(Source: wordsnquotes.com, via petrichour)

Sep 16

Many of the obstacles you once imagined are not even there.

Many of the obstacles you once imagined are not even there.

(Source: livelovebuddha)

Italian Rustic Bread Roll (by Sara)
recipe for Tuscan bread here

Italian Rustic Bread Roll (by Sara)

recipe for Tuscan bread here

“Remember: Magic spells take many forms, from spoken word to candle burning, to mixing oils, to something as simple as posting an image on the wall. Your energy, focus and intent are what transform simple actions, words and gestures into magic spells.” —

Judika Illes, Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

(via dryadwitch)

(via parkstepp)

Image: Sandro Botticelli’s Madonna of the Magnificat, which depicts Lucrezia Tornabuoni and her granddaughter Lucrezia de’ Medici as the Madonna and Child
That much of her influence was necessarily indirect may be apparent from her treatment of biblical women who excel at ‘meddling’. As Judith boldly says to the priests when she is about to seduce Holofernes, “[God] has put it into my heart / to meddle in things so that your vows will be heard.” Tornabuoni, too, clearly ‘meddled’ in her sons’ education, in Florentine social and cultural affairs, in the Tuscan literary tradition of Dante and Petrarch, in a tradition of religious verse dominated by men who were members of religious orders, and finally, in the biblical stories themselves.
Her bold and elegant poetry draws as much from popular culture as it does from the elite circles of writers and artists with whom she was intimate, so that Tornabuoni emerges as an ‘other voice’ who dared to challenge, with cunning indirection, conservative Florentine assumptions about womens’ limitations in the fields of politics and poetry alike. Her verse thus not only gives us a glimpse into Florence at the very height of its Renaissance, but also offers us a reflection on the constraints, for women, of the Renaissance while justifying women’s occasionally necessary interventions in the public domain. That Tornabuoni herself consistently meddled with the distinctions between private and public, social and political, feminine and masculine spaces so valued by Florentines such as Leon Battista Alberti and Niccolo Macchiavelli is another reason her poetry is of such vital interest today.
—Jane Tylus, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de’ Medici’s Sacred Narratives
(via fuckyeahrenaissancewomen:)

Image: Sandro Botticelli’s Madonna of the Magnificat, which depicts Lucrezia Tornabuoni and her granddaughter Lucrezia de’ Medici as the Madonna and Child

That much of her influence was necessarily indirect may be apparent from her treatment of biblical women who excel at ‘meddling’. As Judith boldly says to the priests when she is about to seduce Holofernes, “[God] has put it into my heart / to meddle in things so that your vows will be heard.” Tornabuoni, too, clearly ‘meddled’ in her sons’ education, in Florentine social and cultural affairs, in the Tuscan literary tradition of Dante and Petrarch, in a tradition of religious verse dominated by men who were members of religious orders, and finally, in the biblical stories themselves.

Her bold and elegant poetry draws as much from popular culture as it does from the elite circles of writers and artists with whom she was intimate, so that Tornabuoni emerges as an ‘other voice’ who dared to challenge, with cunning indirection, conservative Florentine assumptions about womens’ limitations in the fields of politics and poetry alike. Her verse thus not only gives us a glimpse into Florence at the very height of its Renaissance, but also offers us a reflection on the constraints, for women, of the Renaissance while justifying women’s occasionally necessary interventions in the public domain. That Tornabuoni herself consistently meddled with the distinctions between private and public, social and political, feminine and masculine spaces so valued by Florentines such as Leon Battista Alberti and Niccolo Macchiavelli is another reason her poetry is of such vital interest today.

—Jane Tylus, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de’ Medici’s Sacred Narratives

(via fuckyeahrenaissancewomen:)

(via housemedici)

[video]