Many of the obstacles you once imagined are not even there.

Many of the obstacles you once imagined are not even there.

Album Art

Madeleine Peyroux - Between The Bars

from: Careless Love

(via chinchillala:)

Played 1099 times.
Italian Rustic Bread Roll (by Sara)
recipe for Tuscan bread here

Italian Rustic Bread Roll (by Sara)

recipe for Tuscan bread here

"Remember: Magic spells take many forms, from spoken word to candle burning, to mixing oils, to something as simple as posting an image on the wall. Your energy, focus and intent are what transform simple actions, words and gestures into magic spells."

Judika Illes, Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

(via dryadwitch)

Image: Sandro Botticelli’s Madonna of the Magnificat, which depicts Lucrezia Tornabuoni and her granddaughter Lucrezia de’ Medici as the Madonna and Child
That much of her influence was necessarily indirect may be apparent from her treatment of biblical women who excel at ‘meddling’. As Judith boldly says to the priests when she is about to seduce Holofernes, “[God] has put it into my heart / to meddle in things so that your vows will be heard.” Tornabuoni, too, clearly ‘meddled’ in her sons’ education, in Florentine social and cultural affairs, in the Tuscan literary tradition of Dante and Petrarch, in a tradition of religious verse dominated by men who were members of religious orders, and finally, in the biblical stories themselves.
Her bold and elegant poetry draws as much from popular culture as it does from the elite circles of writers and artists with whom she was intimate, so that Tornabuoni emerges as an ‘other voice’ who dared to challenge, with cunning indirection, conservative Florentine assumptions about womens’ limitations in the fields of politics and poetry alike. Her verse thus not only gives us a glimpse into Florence at the very height of its Renaissance, but also offers us a reflection on the constraints, for women, of the Renaissance while justifying women’s occasionally necessary interventions in the public domain. That Tornabuoni herself consistently meddled with the distinctions between private and public, social and political, feminine and masculine spaces so valued by Florentines such as Leon Battista Alberti and Niccolo Macchiavelli is another reason her poetry is of such vital interest today.
—Jane Tylus, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de’ Medici’s Sacred Narratives
(via fuckyeahrenaissancewomen:)

Image: Sandro Botticelli’s Madonna of the Magnificat, which depicts Lucrezia Tornabuoni and her granddaughter Lucrezia de’ Medici as the Madonna and Child

That much of her influence was necessarily indirect may be apparent from her treatment of biblical women who excel at ‘meddling’. As Judith boldly says to the priests when she is about to seduce Holofernes, “[God] has put it into my heart / to meddle in things so that your vows will be heard.” Tornabuoni, too, clearly ‘meddled’ in her sons’ education, in Florentine social and cultural affairs, in the Tuscan literary tradition of Dante and Petrarch, in a tradition of religious verse dominated by men who were members of religious orders, and finally, in the biblical stories themselves.

Her bold and elegant poetry draws as much from popular culture as it does from the elite circles of writers and artists with whom she was intimate, so that Tornabuoni emerges as an ‘other voice’ who dared to challenge, with cunning indirection, conservative Florentine assumptions about womens’ limitations in the fields of politics and poetry alike. Her verse thus not only gives us a glimpse into Florence at the very height of its Renaissance, but also offers us a reflection on the constraints, for women, of the Renaissance while justifying women’s occasionally necessary interventions in the public domain. That Tornabuoni herself consistently meddled with the distinctions between private and public, social and political, feminine and masculine spaces so valued by Florentines such as Leon Battista Alberti and Niccolo Macchiavelli is another reason her poetry is of such vital interest today.

—Jane Tylus, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de’ Medici’s Sacred Narratives

(via fuckyeahrenaissancewomen:)

David Sylvian - Some Kind Of Fool

from: Everything And Nothing

(Source: youtube.com)

Nostalghia (1983), Andrei Tarkovsky

(via vivelamours:)

(Source: bad-poets-society)

Villa di Castello, a Medici villa in Tuscany, designed during the Renaissance. 

(Source: penthesileas)

"Beauty awakens the soul to act."
— Dante Alighieri

Title Page from Dante’s Inferno by Tom Phillips

Album Art

David Sylvian - September

Album: Secrets of the Beehive

Played 3983 times.

Café Latte (by r.e. ~)

"

Oh soul,
you worry too much.

You have seen your own strength.
You have seen your own beauty.
You have seen your golden wings.

Of anything less,
why do you worry?

You are in truth
the soul, of the soul,
of the soul.

"

Rumi

(via graceandcompany)

(Source: wasbella102)

Time changes not,
but all things change in time.For time is the forcethat holds events separate,each in its own proper place.Time is not in motion,but ye move through time as your consciousnessmoves from one event to another.
Aye, by time yet exist, all in all,an eternal ONE existence.Know ye that even though in the time ye are separate,yet still are ONE, in all times existent.
- Emerald Tablets of Thoth
(via allegoricaltranslations: / raspuma:)

Time changes not,

but all things change in time.
For time is the force
that holds events separate,
each in its own proper place.
Time is not in motion,
but ye move through time 
as your consciousness
moves from one event to another.

Aye, by time yet exist, all in all,
an eternal ONE existence.
Know ye that even though in the time ye are separate,
yet still are ONE, in all times existent.

- Emerald Tablets of Thoth

(via allegoricaltranslations: / raspuma:)

Rimbaud by Jean Louis Forain (1872)

Rimbaud by Jean Louis Forain (1872)